i4i Claims that Microsoft Violated a Patent

08/14/2009 | Business Litigation

I handle business litigation and disputes in and around Louisville, Kentucky for small businesses--I represent the little guy and I always root for the little guy taking on the big guy.  And here is a case where you can really root for the little guy.  

In a David v Goliath showdown, it appears round one goes to David.  In what has become a very interesting intellectual property dispute, tiny software manufacturer Toronto-based i4i, which has 30 employees, claims that Microsoft violated an obscure patent related to Extensible Markup Language or XML. It's a key software component of many websites and 
computer programs, including Word.  
Microsoft Loses $290 million verdict


Tuesday, Texas Federal District Court Judge Leonard Davis agreed with i4i and entered an order fining the software giant Microsoft $290 million and ordering them to stop selling Word in the United States.
Judge Davis' ruling came following a jury verdict that found that Microsoft had infringed on i4i's 1998 patent.  The jury awarded $200 million and Judge Leonard Judge Davis ruled that Microsoft should pay i4i an additional $40 million for its willful infringement of the i4i patent. Microsoft also was ordered to pay slightly more than $37 million in prejudgment interest, including an additional $21,102 per day until a final judgment is reached in the case. The court also ordered Microsoft to pay $144,060 per day until the date of final judgment for post-verdict damages.

i4i was represented by the national business litigation firm McKool Smith.  

hans